Mains Question for UPSC Aspirants

Mains Question for UPSC Aspirants

02 May 2022 gs-mains-paper-1 INDIAN & WORLD GEOGRAPHY     
Question : Give an account of the heat budget of the Earth.

(GS Mains; Paper 1)
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07 Apr 2022 gs-mains-paper-1 INDIAN & WORLD GEOGRAPHY    
Question : Mention the physiographic characteristics of the Northern Plains of India.

(GS Mains; Paper 1)
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13 Mar 2022 gs-mains-paper-1 INDIAN & WORLD GEOGRAPHY     
Question : Mention the controlling factors of oceanic salinity. What are the effects of ocean salinity?

(GS Mains; Paper-1)
Geography: Physical Geography
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20 Feb 2022 gs-mains-paper-1 INDIAN & WORLD GEOGRAPHY    
Question : Mention the characteristics and distribution of black cotton soil in India.

(GS Mains; Paper 1)
Indian Geography
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18 Feb 2022 gs-mains-paper-1 INDIAN & WORLD GEOGRAPHY    
Question : How does the sub-tropical jet stream play a significant role in both hindering the Monsoon winds as well as quick onset of Indian Monsoons?  Explain.

(GS Mains; Paper 1)
Physical Geography
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18 Jan 2022 gs-mains-paper-1 INDIAN & WORLD GEOGRAPHY    
Question : Discuss Africa’s minerals wealth and its potential role in its economic development. Suggest the ways to unlock mineral-rich African countries’ full potential.

(GS MAINS; PAPER 1 – World Economic Geography)
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11 Jan 2022 gs-mains-paper-1 INDIAN & WORLD GEOGRAPHY     
Question : Describe the bottom relief of Indian Ocean.

(GS MAINS; PAPER 1)
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06 Dec 2021 gs-mains-paper-1 INDIAN & WORLD GEOGRAPHY    
Question : Discuss the salient features of agro-climatic regions and explain their utility for agricultural development planning in India.

(GS MAINS; PAPER 1)
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10 Nov 2021 gs-mains-paper-1 INDIAN & WORLD GEOGRAPHY    
Question : Distinguish between hazards and disasters and identify the major flood prone areas of India.

(GS MAINS; PAPER 1)
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09 Nov 2021 gs-mains-paper-1 INDIAN & WORLD GEOGRAPHY    
Question : Discuss the origin and distribution of mid-latitude cyclones.

(GS MAINS; PAPER 1)
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02 Oct 2021 gs-mains-paper-1 INDIAN & WORLD GEOGRAPHY 
Question : Cotton cultivation in India generally coincides with the distribution of regur soils (Black Soils), explain.

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30 Aug 2021 gs-mains-paper-1 INDIAN & WORLD GEOGRAPHY      
Question : Discuss the principle of working of Atmospheric Water Generator. How it could be a solution to providing clean potable Water for all life and needs on the planet? Elaborate.

GS MAINS PAPER-1 (Geography) and
GS MAINS PAPER-3 (S&T/Environment)

 
Write or upload your answer - SUBMIT A-CUBE IAS Answer :
The AWG converts water vapor into liquid water, mostly by condensation. It cools the moist air to temperatures below its dew point, causing a phase change from vapor to liquid water over the cooling surfaces, which is then collected. Condensation-based AWGs operate on a vapor-compression refrigeration cycle
Atmospheric water generation continuously produces water from air preserves, rather than depleting local water sources. Essentially, this technology is making rain in a box on-demand and ready for human consumption just about anywhere in the world.
Atmospheric water generation does not try to make polluted water potable; it’s designed to make its own water off the grid.
AWG generators range from home-based units that can produce 1 to 20 litres of water per day to commercial-scale units capable of 1,000 to over 10,000 litres per day. Water production rates are highly dependent upon the air temperature and the amount of water vapor (i.e., humidity) in the air. The decentralized aspect of atmospheric water generation creates benefits like lower costs for new infrastructure, ecological restoration, community benefits, private financing etc.
Despite challenges to AWG like, humidity constraint, flawed method for energy requirement etc. AWGs can have a tremendous impact on larger communities


28 May 2021 INDIAN & WORLD GEOGRAPHY 
Question : "Cyclones are inevitable, but communities need fiscal rehabilitation for their recovery." Examine this statement in the context of recent tropical cyclones in India.

(GS MAINS; PAPER 1)
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India’s capacity to deal  with  Cyclones is being tested with  a very Severe Cyclonic Storm, Yaas, striking Odisha  and a  stronger Cyclone Tauktae wreaked havoc along the west coast.
Although the preparation causes mass evacuation from habitations which appears to have limited the loss of life. But still thousands have lost houses and property. The problems of corruption had also been reported during the relief operations 
India will have to improve its resilience to cyclones. Government is raising the capacity of the disaster response forces, but much work needs to be done when it comes to protecting assets and creating fiscal instruments to help people rebuild their lives.
World Meteorological Organization in its State of the Global Climate 2020 report described Cyclone Amphan that hit Bengal last year as the costliest cyclone on record for the North Indian Ocean, with economic losses to India of the order of $14 billion. In the light such reports Rehabilitation and reconstruction need to be included in more strategic plans, although in practice they tend to be poorly integrated with emergency response
Apart from providing emergency needs of medical care, food, shelter, clothing and facilities that are essential for health, safety and welfare, power and transport, fiscal measure need to be created for faster recovery of affected communities. Government must insure people against losses from catastrophes using a system of documentation that makes relief and rehabilitation funds non-discretionary.
Governments are best placed to compensate people, since they can spread the cost of the risk of disasters across the population. But the challenge is to address the risk of cyclones and other extreme weather events using specific funds, making citizens members in a social insurance model. Considering the negative climate change impact on tropical cyclones, rebuilding should use a green, build back better approach. 



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